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Dr. Adeera Levin

Dr. Adeera Levin is Professor of Medicine and Head of the Division of Nephrology at University of British Columbia. She is the Executive Director of the BC Provincial Agency, responsible for the planning, and delivery of kidney services in BC. She was Co-director of the Clinical Investigator Training Program at UBC, and is Curriculum Chair of the KRESCENT program , a unique pan-Canadian training program for Kidney Scientists, co funded by CIHR, Kidney Foundation of Canada and Canadian Society of Nephrology.

Her research interests are in early CKD, variability of progression and co-morbidities, health care delivery and outcomes research. She has contributed to the understanding of CKD trajectories, definitions and clinical care through numerous research activities and guideline development work. Dr. Levin is the principal investigator of a pan-Canadian study, Can-PREDDICT: Prediction of dialysis, death and interim cardiovascular events in CKD: a cohort study of over 2500 patients with biosamples followed for up to 5 years. She was the national lead for SHARP, and is currently the co lead for CREDENCE.

Dr. Levin has won numerous awards for teaching and research. She is a recipient of the Order of Canada and has received the Kidney Foundation of Canada Medal for Research Excellence and the Aubrey J. Tingle Prize in recognition of a body of work which has impacted patients in BC and elsewhere. She was inducted in the Canadian Academy for Health Sciences in 2014. She was elected President of the International Society of Nephrology 2015-17.

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Dr. Braden Manns

Dr. Braden Manns is the Svare Professor in Health Economics and a Nephrologist at the University of Calgary in the Departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences and an Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions Health Scholar. He is the Scientific Director of the Alberta Health Services Kidney – Strategic Clinical Network. He has expertise in Applied Health Economics and clinical research in Nephrology and is co-PI for an inter-disciplinary team grant investigating chronic disease (www.icdc.ca).

Dr. Manns’ current research interests include examining the implications of patient-borne costs on care and outcomes in chronic disease, examining the cost effectiveness of strategies and health care policies for managing patients with chronic disease, and assessing the adequacy of care for Albertans with diabetes, among other projects. He has experience in pharmaceutical priority setting, having served on provincial and national committees for drug evaluation, including a term as Chair of Canadian Expert Drug Advisory Committee from 2006-2008.

Dr. Manns is the President of the Canadian Society of Nephrology and principal investigator of a Canadian kidney disease knowledge translation network, guiding health policy for patients with kidney disease (www.CANN-NET.ca ). Dr. Manns teaches a graduate course in economic evaluation and supervises graduate students at all levels of training.

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Dr. James Scholey

Dr. James Scholey is a Professor of Medicine and Physiology and a Physician Scientist in the Department of Medicine at the University of Toronto. He is also a Senior Scientist in the Toronto General Research Institute and a staff physician in the Division of Nephrology in the Department of Medicine at the University Health network and Mount Sinai Hospital.

Dr. Scholey’s research focuses on mechanism(s) responsible for the progression of chronic kidney disease with a special interest in diabetic nephropathy and the renin angiotensin system. His laboratory employs cell-based and murine models of kidney injury. He also has a longstanding interest in the physiology of human diabetic kidney hyperfiltration and the impact of proteinuria on the progression of glomerulonephritis.

Dr. Scholey’s research program in Can-SOLVE CKD is focused on the identification of kidney risk in youth with diabetes mellitus. These studies are a collaborative effort with researchers at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and researchers at the Children’s Hospital Research Institute in Winnipeg.